The Liar’s Girl: Blurb Reveal

My desk is a very busy place at the moment, mostly because I can’t stop adding things to it (see my latest crafting project in the black frame below and more shenanigans on my Instagram) and partly because I felt as if I’d been struck by lightning while I was in Paris with the Bestest Book Idea Evah (disclaimer: they all feel like that when they’re new, I know) so I’m working on a synopsis for that and also fretting about all the books and articles I should be reading because my final year in college (FINAL? What?!) starts in a mere month’s time.

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So this is just a short post to say, ‘This is what my next thriller, The Liar’s Girl, coming March 2018 to both sides of the Atlantic, will be about.’

So, um, this is what my next thriller, The Liar’s Girl, coming March 2018 to both sides of the Atlantic, will be about:

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Her first love confessed to five murders.

But the truth was so much worse.

Dublin’s notorious Canal Killer is ten years into his life sentence when the body of a young woman is fished out of the Grand Canal. Though detectives suspect a copycat is emulating the crimes Will Hurley confessed to as a teen, they turn to him for help. Will says he has the information the police need, but will only give it to one person – the girl he was dating when he committed his horrific crimes.

Alison Smith has spent a decade building a new life. Having moved abroad, she’s confident that her shattered life in Ireland is finally behind her. But when she gets a request from Dublin imploring her to help prevent another senseless murder, she is pulled back to face the past, and the man, she’s worked so hard to forget.


[Dum-dum-DUUUUMMM noise optional.]

Find about more about The Liar’s Girl here, or sign up to my newsletter to make sure you don’t miss any more news. And please do check out my Instagram for More Things From IKEA No One Really Needs.

Now, back to drinking coffee while staring at the screen work…

Why Self-Publishers Should Avoid Bookstores

Recently I was asked to write a sort of factsheet that would act as a starting point for Irish writers considering self-publishing their work. It was a really interesting experience for me because since I signed a traditional deal back in 2015 – Distress Signals was published in May of last year and my second thriller, The Liar’s Girl, will be out next March – I haven’t really spent too much time thinking about self-publishing. So it had been a while since I had to commit to paper (or screen) my feelings on it. Would my advice be different with the benefit of these past two years? Is there such a huge difference between sneaking a peek behind the curtain and getting to go play behind it that my views would change completely? Is there anything I said three, four or even five years ago that I would never even dream of saying now?

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Shakespeare & Company, Paris. 

Well, not really, no. The factsheet turned out to be a very (VERY) condensed version of my ‘how to’ guide, Self-Printed.* But while once upon a time I might have said it’s probably not a good idea to aim to get your self-published books into bookshops, now I’m saying don’t. Don’t do it. At all. Because I can tell you, from what I’ve seen over here on the other side, bookshop shelves are a battleground even for the biggest publishing houses, and it makes little to no impact unless you’re on a lot of them. As an individual, you and your book just can’t compete there.

And if you try to, you are negating the biggest benefit of self-publishing as it is today: the fact that you can sell hundreds or thousands (or even millions) of copies of your book without having to invest in stock. That’s why self-publishing exploded like it did back in 2009(ish): because POD paperbacks and e-books came along. Before that, self-publishing meant sourcing a printer who’d take your money in exchange for a print run of your title – hundreds or maybe a thousand books – which would then live in boxes under your stairs and whisper despair to you every time you passed by, the layer of dust on them growing thicker and thicker. When you decide to self-publish with the aim of getting your book stocked in physical bookstores, you are rejecting this wonderful technological advance and saying you want to go back to the not-so-good old days when self-publishing meant digging yourself a hole of debt with no guarantee you’d ever get to climb out of it.

It just doesn’t make any business sense. Anyone I know who managed to get their book into physical stores didn’t make enough of a profit to justify the time it took to do it, and they all spent months – years, some – waiting to get paid. Some never got paid, they just got the books back. If your goal is to sell books, why spend your time and money so inefficiently? (And hey, your goal should be to sell books. Novels need readers. Getting readers = selling books. If you’re writing just for yourself, or purely for pleasure, or as a pastime, stay doing that. To publish is to start a business, and why bother if you don’t care about whether or not it’ll succeed?)

In my experience, it’s very hard to convince newbie self-publishers of this – and I totally understand why. I often say I didn’t grow up dreaming of seeing my book on a Kindle. We have this idea that it’s not really publishing unless it’s publishing as we know it. But to think this way is a mistake. Self-publishing can do so many wonderful things for you as a writer. You need to embrace what it can achieve and focus on that, instead of trying to force it to do something it wasn’t designed for.

Anyway, the point of this post is that this morning I came across one that makes this point so much better than me, and it’s written from the point of view of the person standing between you and the bookshop shelf: the bookseller. Anyone who tells me they want to get their self-published book into brick-and-mortar stores will be pointed in the direction of this in the future.

You may bristle, but remember, this is based on this bookseller’s own experience with self-published authors. They may not be like you, but they’ve pretty much ruined it for you already. You can say it’s not worth my while even trying to overcome this or you can say I’m going to do everything I can to overcome each of these hurdles but either way, you need to know what’s up. Have a read.

Self-Published Authors – 20 Tips from a Bookseller:

You’ve written a book.

Congratulations, I mean it, and that’s coming from someone who:

  1. is completely incapable of writing a book and
  2. counts eating a whole tube of Pringles in one sitting as a typical life achievement.

However, if you are thinking of bringing your self-published book into my bookshop, you might like to consider the following:

→ Read the rest on The Secret Bookseller.

*Self-Printed is no longer available. The last edition was published in 2014 and as I am totally against people giving advice on things they themselves have not done, I haven’t updated it since and won’t be again anytime soon. Rather than charge money for something out of date, I pulled it. All the blog posts it was based on are still around here somewhere, on my blog. 

 

Why Paris Is Always A Good Idea

Rewind to exactly two weeks ago and find me arriving in Paris, getting to live out a dream: to spend a week at the Centre Culturel Irlandais, or the Irish Cultural Centre.

This is a facility for Irish writers, students, etc. smack bang in the heart of literary Paris. Three minutes’ walk away: Place Contrascarpe, where Hemingway had his first apartment in Paris. Five minutes’ walk away: the Luxembourg Gardens, where he frequently retreated to. Ten minutes’ walk away: Shakespeare & Co, the famous bookshop that first published Ulysses. (There’s so much more, but you get the idea.) The centre itself is down a quiet street, where a heavy green door reveals a tranquil inner courtyard. My room was filled with light and offered a beautiful view of a lush, ivy-covered neighbouring building and a rolling sea of Parisian rooftops (just like— Okay, okay. I’ll stop with the Hemingway now.) Ahead of me stretched a week of writing, Paris and streetside cafe cremes. I was giddy with bliss.

I didn’t even know this place existed until last year when, stood at the end of Rue Soufflot waiting for the lights to change, I looked up and saw a sign for Rue de Irlandais. Google told me what was there and why there was an ‘Irish Street’.  Later, I dashed through April rains to meet my writing friend Elizabeth R. Murray at Notre Dame. She was, by coincidence, in the city with her husband, and we talked about our CCI daydreams. Now, she left a comment on one of the photos I posted saying she was headed to a retreat in Iceland soon, for a month. I laughed and said that we might be in danger of propagating the myth that writers live an enviable, champagne lifestyle…

The next day I was up with the dawn. I eyed my laptop but then decided play first, work later. Everyone goes on about Paris sunsets, but I love the mornings the most. I walked from the CCI to the Eiffel Tower via the Musée d’Orsay (with the help of a few cafe cremes), but by mid-afternoon, I was feeling guilty: the copyeditor had sent The Liar’s Girl back to me a couple of days before, and I had to go through the manuscript to check the changes, answer queries, etc. I took a pre-packed sandwich and a Coke back to my room, opened my laptop and got to work, trying to ignore the fact that outside, Paris was waiting impatiently.

I was also trying to studiously ignore something else: that at seven o’clock Paris time, the Dagger shortlists would be announced at an event in London.

The Daggers are awarded by the Crime Writers’ Association and judged by a panel of crime-writing aficionados, and it seems like every crime writer I loved growing up had the word ‘Dagger’ somewhere in their author bio. They’re a big deal to me. As a reader, I was looking forward to them pointing me in the direction of new books to read. As a writer, they weren’t even on my radar.

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Back in May, I spent twenty-four hours at Crimefest. I was home barely thirty minutes when I got a text message from Andy, a writer friend: she was at the Dagger longlist announcement, and she’d just heard my name read out. This was so out of left-field for me I was scared to tweet anything in case it was a mistake, so I waited (and waited and waited…) until official confirmation had been posted online. Yes, Distress Signals had been longlisted for the John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger award.

(What?!)

Tonight, I would again find out by text message. My friend (and Betty’s of Harrogate buddy) Erin was going to the announcement and had offered to let me know if I’d made the shortlist. Sitting in my room in Paris, I was thinking how awful it was going to be for Erin to have to text me to say ‘Sorry, but…’ but also about the fact that I was a published writer and I was sitting in bloody Paris, for God’s sake, so there was absolutely no need to be disappointed, whatever happened.

The clock ticked closer to seven. I tried to concentrate on my copyedits and pretend not to care. Then I decided that I was so not going to care, I was going to go out. I’d get a drink somewhere, gaze adoringly at Notre Dame  or the Eiffel Tower off in the distance for a while. I stood up, grabbed my bag. I was looking for my key when I heard a little beep: a text message. (Please excuse my, ahem, French response.)

Amazingly, Distress Signals has now been shortlisted for a Dagger. Paris is always a good idea!

You can read more about the Daggers and view all the books on all the Dagger shortlists here.