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5 Ways To Get a Book Deal: Guest Post by Sheena Lambert

19 Mar

This morning we have a guest post from Sheena Lambert, whose novel The Lake comes out today. (Woo-hoo!) Sheena self-published her first novel, A Gathering Storm (previously published as Alberta Clipper) and now this, her second, is one of the first six to be released by KillerReads, an imprint of Harper Collins. Before she started on the champagne for breakfast, Sheena shared her tips on how to get a book deal… 

“So you want a book deal? No problem! The following is a vaguely scientific way of achieving your goal. For the purposes of this post, I am going to assume that you have written a book worthy of publication; a rather weighty assumption, granted, but we have to start somewhere. This is not a how-to on writing a book; this is a how-to getting it onto bookshelves.

So, let’s get started. There are a number of ways of getting a book deal.

  1. Be famous. Yes, famous people get book deals all the time. It’s understandable – it’s a lot easier to market a famous person, and most of us want to read what famous people have to write. So, go and rob a bank, or have an affair with a politician, or become a politician (just for a while – you don’t have to stay that way), and I can almost guarantee that you will be offered a publishing deal for your book.
  2. Be a journalist first. It’s a lot easier to get noticed by the relevant people in publishing if you have a track-record in being paid for writing, and it’s a lot easier to get paid work in journalism than in books. Have you counted the number of debut authors who have day jobs with the Times newspapers? Exactly.
  3. Have a wild past, or make one up. No one is interested in reading a debut novel by Mary Smith who was born and has lived all her life in the same small town in the country. But MJ Smyth, an ex-nun and recovered heroin addict who spent his/her (no one is sure) thirties travelling through Siberia in atonement for past life indiscretions? I’d read me some of that.
  4. A good head of swishy hair. I don’t know why, just believe me that it will increase your chances of publication significantly.
  5. Self-publish first. Yes, fine, it might sound a little pedestrian when compared with options 1-4 above, but it’s a truth that is becoming increasingly apparent – successful self-publishing helps you noticed by the big boys.

The Lake - 3D

This is how I got my book deal. (Did I mention my novel The Lake has just been published by HarperCollins? Finish reading this, and I’ll show you where you can buy your very own copy.) I am neither famous, nor do I have a particularly notable past. My hair is unremarkable to say the least. I have written the odd journalistic piece in my time, but I would certainly not refer to myself as a journalist.

I did, however, self-publish my first novel. Not without a lot of help from Catherine Ryan Howard and her Self-Printed books [ed. note: Oh, stop! *blushes*], I self-published A Gathering Storm in 2012, both as an ebook and in paperback. The book got itself noticed by a major wholesaler in my home country of Ireland, which led to it being stocked and sold alongside traditionally published books in real, live bookshops. So when my second novel The Lake was ready to send out to agents and publishers, I had some credentials: I had a track record of selling and marketing books successfully, I had a following who were keen to read my next book, I had form.

Interestingly, the traditional publishing deal I got for The Lake was not so traditional – rather it came in the form of HarperCollins’s new digital first crime/thriller imprint KillerReads. Instead of arguing against the ebook revolution, HarperCollins have embraced this phenomenal phenomenon with their digital first imprints which publish the ebook, a little like the hardback of yore, as a forerunner to the paperback (my paperback is out on 4th June. Just saying). With a digital first imprint, the ebook is given all the pomp and circumstance it deserves, rather than being treated like the less-loved, problem child that has to be endured.

As a self-published author, the idea of putting emphasis on the ebook felt very comfortable for me, and I’m guessing HarperCollins KillerReads liked the fact that I had experience of digital publishing. No one successfully self-publishes without learning the social media ropes, and that experience was very useful when it came to working with the HarperCollins team in the run up to The Lake’s publication date.

So in the proverbial shell of the nut, self-publishing my first book helped me get an agent for my second, and a publishing deal followed. And I’m not the only writer this has happened to. Hardly a week goes by that we don’t hear about a self-published author landing a significant book deal with a publishing house. Rather than putting publishers off, having experience of self-publishing can make you and your book a very attractive gamble these days.

So what are you waiting for? Not a six figure deal from one of the Big Six (or is it Five these days?) I hope? Well, of course, that would be nice, but while you are waiting for that, invest in a copy of Catherine Ryan Howard’s Self-Printed [ed. note: I see what you did there…] and get yourself a head start in self-publishing.

Unless, of course, you have swishy hair, in which case sit tight. Those six figures will come to you.”

The Lake is available on Amazon.co.uk for less than the price of the venti wet latte, extra hot please, that I’ll be having in a minute. It is also a great read. The first two chapters are available to read for free here, and you can follow Sheena on Twitter at @shewithonee.

I’m off to buy some volumizing shampoo. Thanks Sheena and congrats! x

Sheena Lambert, The Lake

More about The Lake:

September 1975.

A body is discovered in the receding waters of a manmade lake, and for Peggy Casey, 23-year-old landlady of The Angler’s Rest, nothing will ever be the same.

Detective Sergeant Frank Ryan is dispatched from Dublin, and his arrival casts an uneasy spotlight on the damaged history of the valley, and on the difficult relationships that bind Peggy and her three older siblings. Over the course of the weekend, Detective Ryan’s investigation will not only uncover the terrible truth behind the dead woman’s fate, but will also expose the Casey family’s deepest secrets.

Secrets never meant to be revealed.

Want a Date with an Agent? Let Writing.ie Set You Up!

6 Mar

Dreaming of writing a bestseller? Five leading agents are looking for you!

The International Literature Festival Dublin is running Date With An Agent 2015 – Ireland’s largest ever talent-spotting event. We are looking for 75 top quality authors to pitch their work to 5 leading literary agents keen to sign new talent on 16th May 2015.

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To be in with a chance to take part in the event, submit the first 1,500 words of your  book in hard copy with a 1,000 word synopsis, a 500 word author biography and the completed Application Form (available from the International Literature Festival Dublin website) and €10 entry fee (if using TicketSolve, include a copy of your ticket) – please ensure that ONLY your book title is on the pages of your submission as all applications will be judged anonymously.

Submissions to the event will be assessed by Vanessa Fox O’Loughlin and a team of consultants from The Inkwell Group.  Experienced literary scouts Inkwell have assisted award winning and bestselling authors to publication and will be reading every application, matching the selected authors to agents including:

  • Simon Trewin, Partner and Head of Literary at WME
  • Sallyanne Sweeney of Mulcahy Associates
  • Clare Wallace, Darley Anderson Literary, TV and Film agency
  • Julia Churchill, AM Heath
  • Paul Feldstein, Feldstein Literary Agency

Please staple the synopsis and chapters together firmly, and the Application Form and author biography together separately from the chapters. The closing date for applications is midnight on 27th March, please ensure you allow sufficient time for delivery. Items postmarked up to 26th March will be accepted.

This year the full day of agent panel, editor panel (including Patricia Deevy of Penguin Random House and Paula Campbell of Poolbeg/Ward River Press), multi award winning author Mary Costello in conversation, and Vanessa Fox O’Loughlin’s getting published tips will be open to all writers, both to those who have successfully submitted to meet an agent, and to those may not be ready to do so,  at a cost of €50. Successful applicants will be scheduled to discuss their book with one of the agent panel and will be notified of the time of their meeting. The event will take place on 16th May.

Date With an Agent Rules, Terms & Conditions:

Please ensure:

  • Your submission is double-spaced
  • Printed in 12pt Times New Roman or Arial, single sided.
  • All PAGES ARE NUMBERED
  • That your name does not appear on the submission
  • That your book title does appear on every page of your submission (in header or footer)
  • Your submission consists of the opening 1,500 words of your book and a 1,000 word synopsis.

Please staple your opening chapter and synopsis together, stapling your author biography (500 words) to the application form NOT to the chapters.

Please do not put your submission in a folder or bind it in anyway.

Please do NOT send your entire book. The writing sample will give The Inkwell Group team a very clear idea of the impact of your opening chapter on a reader, your writing style, voice and delivery. If successful, the agents will read your submission prior to meeting you and should they wish to see more, will ask for it.

  • The International Literature Festival Dublin Date With An Agent event is open to unagented writers of any nationality writing in English, 18 years old and over at the time of the closing date.
  • Submissions may be fiction (novel or short story collection) or non-fiction.
  • Submissions will only be accepted in the format specified. All submission fees are non-refundable.
  • The submission address is The Inkwell Group, The Old Post Office, Kilmacanogue, County Wicklow.
  • Multiple submissions are accepted. Writers may make as many submissions as they choose but the submission fee must be paid for each submission.
  • Books do not need to be completed but please indicate the full word count of the manuscript (what you actually have rather than what you hope to have!)
  • Cheques and postal orders should be made payable to International Literature Festival Dublin. Credit card payments are facilitated online via TicketSolve.
  • If your application is successful you will be notified by 17th April and required to book a ticket for workshop on 16th May at a cost of €50. This includes all refreshments, the morning agent panel session, a ‘getting published’ session with Vanessa Fox O’Loughlin, multi award winning author Mary Costello in conversation and a panel discussion with several leading editors.
  • If you are unsuccessful in being selected, you are very welcome to attend the main part of the event, at a cost of €50.
  • Writers not submitting work for consideration are also welcome to attend the event at a cost of €50.
  • The International Literature Festival Dublin is not responsible for travel or accommodation for participants. If you are unable to attend for any reason, please notify International Literature Festival Dublin immediately so your place can be transferred. Bookings are non-refundable except in special circumstances.
  • The selector’s decision will be final and no correspondence may be entered into, however in addition to the shortlist of selected writers, there will be a reserve list compiled, if appropriate, in case of cancellation. Writers will be notified by 20th April if their application has been successful. Due to the logistics of selection International Literature Festival Dublin cannot notify unsuccessful candidates.
  • Entries must be entirely the work of the entrant and by submitting you are confirming that the work is your own. Any evidence to the contrary will result in immediate disqualification.
  • Submission is open to books that have been self-published, but not to books that have been previously published by a publishing house.
  • Please inform us immediately if you accept an offer of representation elsewhere prior to the event. Submission & booking fees will not be refunded
  • Entries are not returned; make sure you keep a copy. Unsuccessful entries will be destroyed.
  • Amendments cannot be made to entries after they have been submitted, nor substitutions made.  If entrants wish to correct errors they must submit a new entry, marked ‘Final Version’ on the title page, and enter again with payment of the entry fee.  No correspondence or discussion about amendments will be entered into.
  • Please ensure that you use the correct postage.  If insufficient postage is used, International Literature Festival Dublin will not pay the additional postage required and the entry will be returned by An Post.
  • Enclose a stamped addressed postcard marked ‘DATE WITH AN AGENT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT’ if you require acknowledgement of receipt of your entry.
  • It is not possible to confirm receipt of entries by phone or email correspondence.
  • Entries submitted posthumously will not be eligible.
  • Entries will not be eligible where the author is a member of the judging panel, anyone involved in the administration of the festival or a close family relative of any such person. Writers currently serving a term of imprisonment are ineligible for the event.
  • International Literature Festival Dublin reserves the right to alter the proposed programme without notice.
  • In entering your submission, you agree that your contact details will be added to the International Literature Festival Dublin and Inkwell Group e-mailing lists. Your details will not be shared with any third parties.
  • In entering your submission you are deemed to have accepted these terms and conditions

Good Luck!

Scenes from The Rewrite

15 Feb

As you may know, I’ve been rewriting my novel.

I started on the 11th January and I finished the main* part of the book at 1:17am this morning, after a thirteen hour writing stint that surely put me at risk for curvature of the spine, RSI and deep vein thrombosis.

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This isn’t because my agent is some kind of task-master, but because this gap – from the first day I returned to university after Christmas and had handed in my Michaelmas term essays, to this coming Friday when my next two essays are assigned – was the only time I had. If the rewrite ran over, it would clash with my essay-writing. If it ran over again, it would clash with studying for and then taking my exams in May. The summer is reserved for (a) being horizontal, preferably in a sunny place with a view of a pool, a stack of the all the books I haven’t read since last summer within easy reach and (b) writing the first draft of another book. (Sweet baby Jesus.) So I had to put a lifetime’s habit of procrastination and deadline-avoiding to one side and just get on with it.

I’m writing a post for another website on how exactly I managed to do that, but since this blog is but a stretch of hot, black tarmac for some tumbleweeds to run across, I thought I’d share some scenes from The Rewrite this morning, just so you know moi’s little pink blog is still alive.

The Rewrite wasn’t supposed to be too structural, as in none of the major plot points needed fixing. This was more a case of deepening characterization (I LOVE plotting but sometimes I, ahem, forget to flesh out the people the stuff is happening to), ironing out a few rough edges and just making everything stronger and clearer and more convincing.

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But you change one thing…

I wasn’t at the end of the second chapter and things were already getting twistier than a Curly-Wurly. So I turned to my forever friends, Post-Its. And then because I needed somewhere to stick them, I printed out charts, one for each act. And then I had to get a calendar so I could keep track of my progress, and then I had to make a calendar for the book so I could keep track of what happened when, and then I had to make a scene list because I wasn’t sure where the B story chapters were going to go and then I keeled over and wondered why my dream wasn’t just to see the Grand Canyon or something, you know, doable.

(Although that was one of my other dreams. And I did get to see the Grand Canyon.)

In the end though, I did it. I have to say that when you have a twisty, complicated plot, writing fast is a huge advantage. Whenever I was forced to take a couple of days’ break, it took me a while to get back up to speed with who was where and why and what was supposed to happen next and what thread I was supposed to be picking back up, but when I wrote everyday, all that stuff just stayed in my head. (Mostly. When it didn’t: Post-Its.)

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Now I’m going to leave it for a few days before I do a typo-hunt and consistency check and also, because this book is a logistical nightmare, a list of who knows what when, so I can check I haven’t made any plotting decisions that could only be explained by coincidence, psychic abilities or Oceanic Flight 815.

Then I’m going to put on my PJs, order in and binge-watch the shite out of something.

THE END.

(Until next week.)

*My book has a main, A story that takes up 80% of it. Two other characters have chapters that are interspersed throughout the main plot, which isn’t really a B story technically speaking but that’s just what I call it for ease. 

Talking Self-Publishing, Doing Rewrites

24 Jan

Hello? *looks around* Is anyone still here?

Apologies for my blog silence this far into the new year, but I am BUSY. Ever since I started university back in September – and realized, belatedly, that I don’t really have time to go to university full-time and do all the stuff I normally do – I feel like I’ve been saying that a lot, to the point where even I’m completely sick of it. The word has lost all its meaning.

But I am very…

Well, let’s just say time-challenged. 

At the moment, before I get more essay assignments (didn’t we just have those? DRAMATIC GROAN) and then, once they’re handed in, we start – GASP! – studying for exams (and also learning how to handwrite something that’s longer than a shopping list for the first time in more than ten years – looking forward to that), I’m all about this: The Rewrite.

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My agent (doesn’t that sound nice? My agent…!) has a truly wonderful in-house editor who read my novel – The Serial Killer Thriller – and then sent me several pages of ideas on how to improve it. Luckily there’s no structural changes but there’s still plenty to do, and I’m trying to do it as quickly as possible due to the aforementioned essays and exams. The bottom line is I either get this rewrite done now, or I have to wait until the summer to even start it.

So: no blogging. No binge-watching. (Another reason to move fast – House of Cards Series 3 starts streaming in February!) No reading for pleasure. (What’s that? It’s been so long I can’t remember.) No leaving the house for long periods of time. No fun-having.

Which is why I’m really looking forward to the Irish Writers’ Centre Publishing Day: Focus on Self-Publishing event next Saturday, January 31st. (It’s outside! I get to go to there! Without feeling guilty!) It features Vanessa Fox-O’Loughlin talking all things self-publishing, Robert Doran (who has guest-blogged right here) on all things editing, Anne-Marie Scully on all things Amazon and then Emily Evans and me in conversation about how we did it. The price is €60.00 for non-members and as with all IWC events, you’re bound to go away feeling all motivated and with the knowledge you need to get the job done. To find out more or to book, visit the IWC website.

See you there!

*retreats back into writing cave*

Happy New Year!

31 Dec

Happy New Year! I wish you everything you wish for in 2015.

Today Writing.ie have posted a blog of mine, Finish Your Damn Book. It’s what I needed to read this time last year, so I’m sharing it with you now.

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Are you writing a book? Been meaning to start? Been “finishing” a novel, whatever that means, for longer that you’re comfortable admitting? Maybe you’re like Badger in Breaking Bad, well able to lead anyone who cares to listen through every plot point of your tale – a Star Trek spec script, in his case – only to end with “I gotta write it down, is all…” If so, then read on.

One afternoon in August 2008 a much anticipated e-mail landed in my inbox. I’d sold my laptop back in Orlando to fund my subsequent adventure in Central America, so I had to check it on the family PC, in full view of half of the family. It was from an assistant at a literary agency in London – let’s call her Helen – who had loved a travel memoir I’d sent her, Mousetrapped, and had pitched it enthusiastically to her boss. I double-clicked. I’m writing with some good and some bad news. Unfortunately we don’t feel there is enough of a market for us to be able to represent Mousetrapped … However we love your writing. What are you working on now? We would be really interested in reading it. Do you write fiction?

Fiction was all I really wanted to write – Mousetrapped has just been an accidental detour – and now here was an agent saying she wanted to read it! Fantastic! Now there was just the little matter of actually writing some…”

Click here to read the full post.

See you next year!

 

Merry Christmas and Here’s to a Very Exciting 2015!

23 Dec

Thank you so much for sticking around these much-neglected parts this year! Write more blog posts and post blogs more frequently is on my list of New Year’s resolutions, I swear. My last post was a bit of a recap of the year and all its university-going and agent-getting excitement, but if you’re looking for something to read while you queue at the tills in the midst of department-store-mania or just need a quiet escape over the holidays with a cup of coffee and your phone, below are a list of quick links to 2014’s most popular posts. I went for quality over quantity this year, so although the list is short, the reading times are generally loooooong…

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Catherine’s Caffeinated’s Highlights of 2014:

Mel Sherratt, Laura Pepper WuC.S. Larkin, Jean Grainger, Dan Holloway and Pat Fitzpatrick were all fantabulous special guest stars and the ever-annoying US tax withholding situation got a complete makeover this year too. You can read about it here.

Finally thanks to the VAT shambles, I will no longer be selling my e-books directly to readers come January 1st. If you want to buy direct from me, you have to do it before December 31st.

Have a very Merry Christmas and a fantastic New Year. See you soon! 

Catherine x

The Surprising Thing About Rejection (Or What I Learned in 2014)

5 Dec

This will likely be my last blog post in 2014 and you might want to make a cup of coffee, because it’s gonna be a long one…

In past Decembers I’ve compiled gift guides, and last year I shared my first Christmas in a place I lived all by myself (and so could decorate as I pleased, safe in the knowledge that no one could touch anything or suddenly appear with a strand of the most offensive substance known to man, tinsel). But this year I’m coming to the end of my first term in Trinity College Dublin, barely three months in to a four-year degree in English Studies that I started at the ripe age of 32, and assignments are due. This necessitated a move to Dublin, one of the most expensive cities in the world; the shoebox I now live in, while comfortable and suitably Catherine-fied, couldn’t fit as much as a bauble. (I have no books here. That’s how small it is.) And once college breaks up at the end of the next week, I have to use my month off to—

Well, let me back up a little.

This has been a very exciting year. There was always something about 2014; I knew it would be a big one. During it I did three things I’ve been dreaming about for ages, for years in some cases: I moved to Dublin, I started studying English at Trinity and I signed with an agent. The agent, rather. The one who is at the very top of your wish list if you’re a woman who writes crime, the one who represents such awe-inspiring writers that you nearly didn’t even bother submitting to her because you assumed there was absolutely no chance, and when—

Well, let me back up a little again.

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2014 Highlights: Trinity College Dublin as it looked on my first day as a student. 

I want to tell you about the two very important lessons I’ve learned this year.

The first is that when it comes to making big changes, pursuing your dreams or just doing anything that will yank you out of your comfort zone, making the decision to do it is the hardest part.

Honestly, it is. Strolling around Trinity’s historical campus one sunny day in September – having previously only ever strolled around it as a tourist – I couldn’t quite believe that I was there. I go here now, I kept whispering to myself. How had it happened? [For those of you who don’t live in Ireland, Trinity is like Ireland’s Harvard. It’s for the top scorers. Mature students aren’t considered on their years-old exam results – thankfully! – but places are incredibly restricted and competition is fierce. But I filled my application form with all my book and publishing antics over the last five years, and I’m convinced that’s what got me in.] I’d had to apply; interview; come up with the fees; find a place to live in Dublin in what was described as the worst year for rental accommodation in three decades; move out; move up; and show up for the first day of Orientation.

But they were all easy compared to sitting in front of my computer at 11.30pm on January 31st last, half an hour before the CAO [Central Applications Office; how we apply to third-level education in Ireland) deadline closed for the year. I drummed my fingers on the desktop. Was I really going to do this? Could I do this? How could I leave the apartment I loved so much? Could I really move to Dublin in just a few months? Live there by myself? Afford to? Was there any real possibility that I would even get in? I’d been thinking about it for months but when it came to down to it, I wasn’t sure. It would be easier not to do anything. With minutes to spare, I finalized my application.

And that was by far the hardest part. Making the initial decision was the most difficult thing I’d had to do. After that, all I was doing was following through.

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Highlights of 2014: Champagne and Starbucks. What more does a girl want? (Thanks for the bubbly, Denise!)

Lesson number two was that rejection doesn’t mean no.

Quick recap, if you’re not familiar: I love self-publishing, and I can’t even imagine where I’d be now without it. (Not here, anyway!) But my goal has always been to get published. I don’t feel the need to justify it but if you’re wondering why, it can be summed up like this: because that’s what I want, okay? This little girl didn’t ask Santa for a typewriter because she was dreaming of seeing her book on the Kindle store after she put it there herself:

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Around about the time I self-published Mousetrapped in 2010, I finished a novel, Results Not Typical. Chick-lit meets corporate satire, I called it, or The Devil Wears Prada meets WeightWatchers. It got me a meeting with the editorial director of a major publishing house, who didn’t like that book but liked me and hoped I might write something else. We met every few months for two years, but after various outlines, sample chapters and synopses, I just wasn’t coming up with the goods. With hindsight I can see that my heart just wasn’t in it. I was trying to write a book that I wouldn’t choose to read, which of course is completely and utterly insane, and insulting to books and stories and publication dreams in general.

Meanwhile I’d had an idea for a crime/thriller novel. I am OBSESSED with crime/thriller novels. They are by far and away what I predominantly read. My favorite author of all time is Michael Connelly. If I color-coordinated my bookshelves, half of them would be black. I just love, love, love a good mystery, a chilling serial killer, a twist that comes like a sudden slap in the face. As for writing them, it’s something I thought I would do when I was older, when I had more experience both in life and as a writer. But one day in the summer of 2012, fed up with my failed attempts to write women’s commercial fiction, I caught myself thinking, When this outline is done, I’m going to try and write that thriller just for fun.

*ALARM BELL ALARM BELL ALARM BELL*

Shouldn’t everything I write be for fun? Why was I doing it otherwise? I ditched all notions of writing anything except the book I wanted to read, the book I really wanted to write.

I’d love to tell you now that I banged it out in a caffeine-fueled week or something, but what followed was eighteen months of mostly procrastination. Still, the idea was percolating away in my brain, so all was not lost. By January of this year I had a long synopsis – or, ahem, an outline; tip: if your synopsis is too long, just call it an outline instead! – and the first third of the book, written and re-written to what I thought was a high standard.

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Highlights of 2014: At the Bord Gais Energy Irish Book Awards with Hazel and Elizabeth. (Photo credit: Derek Flynn.)

I have a lot of writer friends, many of them published, and two of them in particular (shout out, Sheena and Hazel!) urged me to start submitting to agents. I said no, not yet, I want to wait until I feel like it’s perfect or, at the very least, finished. Don’t be daft, they said. Are you happy with the first third? Yes? Send it out then. You’re not a novice, you have all this self-publishing stuff behind you, great contacts and you do freelance work for one of the world’s biggest publishing houses. No, no, I said. I’m not ready. I can’t do it. But they kept at me, Dr Phil-style, and finally I said, Okay, okay. I’ll start submitting.

And then anxiety started pushing its way out of my skin in the form of sweat. My heart began to race. I was genuinely scared of the idea of submitting to an agent.

Why?

Because getting published had been my dream since I realized that people actually wrote the books I loved to read. With 30,000 double-spaced words under my arm and a cover letter I’d been perfecting for months, this dream was still intact. But what if I sent it out and got nothing back but a form rejection letter? That would be devastating, a sharpened scalpel tip right into the balloon of my publication dreams. So of course, it was easier to stay in the limbo in between, where my dreams could still happen.

Making the initial decision to take action was the hardest part.

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Highlight of 2014: finalizing the plot of The Novel.

But I did send it out. And it did get rejected. And I was devastated.

It was rejected by three agents. The first gave me detailed feedback, and some of it caught in my gut. I knew she was right so I rewrote it. The second one just said no (or a disinterested “Nah…” in my head). The third one said no too, in the worst possible way: I really enjoyed it, but I just don’t feel passionate enough about it to represent you. As I feel all authors deserve an agent who is passionate about their work… etc

I have a writer friend whose book launches I’ve been going to every summer for the past four years (shout out, Maria!) and who, not that long ago, went to London to meet with two agents, both of whom were desperate to represent her. They both pitched to her and then she got to pick. We first met at a writers’ workshop back in April 2009, when both of us were just dreamers. It had happened for her; I wanted it to happen – and happen that way – for me. But when the rejections started coming in, I stopped believing that it ever would.

I started thinking, Well, the best I can hope for now is an agent who’ll reluctantly take me on because, well, he’ll give it a go, and a deal with a small publisher with no distribution potential and no advance. I was downsizing. Because here’s the thing: if it was a good book, I thought, wouldn’t its goodness be universally recognized?

I finished my book over the summer and decided that my careful, one-agent-at-a-time strategy wasn’t getting me anywhere. I might never get anywhere, so what did I have to lose? I submitted it to two more agents, the agents, the agents I really wanted but had been holding back on submitting to because (a) if the agents on my next-best-thing list all said the book was a stinking pile of crap, it would need a re-write, and I didn’t want to ruin my one chance with my Dream Agents by sending them the first version (although I should say the agents I had sent it to were still brilliant, amazing, well-known agents that I would’ve been delirious to have been represented by) and (b) I thought there was no point, because they got thousands of submissions a year and took on hardly any new clients.

One of the agents was so selective that she only accepted the first ten pages of your book. Fifty is the norm. I’d no chance. I actually remember being on her website and thinking, There’s no point. It was a repeat of January 31st, drumming my fingers on the desk, thinking there was no point in applying to Trinity.

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Not a highlight, but what I’m stuck with reading as my essay deadline looms. Ugh!

But I’d got into Trinity, and now I was living and studying in Dublin. Making the decision was the hardest part, remember? So I took a deep breath, submitted my ten pages and hoped for the best.

Actually, I just hoped for a response.

Both agents requested the full manuscript. And then they both offered representation, one of them even before she’d finished reading the book. I shook and squealed as I read their e-mails. And just like my friend Maria, I had a day (during my first Reading Week!) where I flew to London and met with two amazing agents and listened, slightly dumbfounded, while they pitched for me and my work.

The day before I’d got an invite to the Irish Book Awards and the day after the new Michael Connelly book came out, so that was quite the giddy week, let me tell you.

A few weeks before my London trip I was watching an episode of ITV’s Crime Thriller Club where crime writing queen Lynda La Plante was being interviewed. She said if she could give advice to aspiring writers it would be that “rejection doesn’t mean no.”

I rolled my eyes. Um, that’s EXACTLY what it means? Come on, Lynda. Aren’t you supposed to be a writer? But after my London day, I realized what she meant.

Publishing is an incredibly subjective operation. Whether or not someone likes your book depends on their personal tastes, their professional experience and even what mood they’re in when they sit down to read it. Whether or not an agent will take you on depends on all this and the level of belief they have in you, what they see in the possibility of what the book can become. Timing factors in too, of course. Maybe they just took on a similar author, or they know that a publishing house just paid five-figures for a similar book. That’s why we have these stories of Ms Author getting rejected all over town for years, and then getting an agent and going on to hit the bestseller lists.

Just because your book got rejected doesn’t mean that your publishing dreams are dead. It doesn’t even mean that you have to modify them. Rejection, as Lynda said, doesn’t mean no.

Last week I signed with Jane Gregory of Gregory & Company. Next week I’ve to hand in my first lot of university assignments. Then I start on a re-write of my novel and after that, who knows what the new year will bring? It might bring everything I want, or it might bring disappointment. I’m ready either way. I’ll keep you updated.

In the meantime, remember that making the decision to take action is by far the hardest part and that rejection doesn’t mean no. Consider this when you sit down to think about your writing goals in 2015.

In the meantime, thanks for reading in 2014, especially as life has got in the way and I’ve become so sporadic with my blogging. I hope to improve a bit in the New Year!

Wishing you and yours a fabulous Christmas and a New Year that brings everything you want.

Catherine x

(Fun fact: this blog post is the exact length each of my four essays has to be. Procrastinating much?)

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